The Year’s Third Update in Pictures

It’s time for another round-up of the garden in pictures! And hoo boy, do we have a lot to share — the garden has been going like gangbusters! We’re posting this a little earlier than normal (considering that our second update wasn’t all that long ago) because we’re going to be take a brief break from blogging next week. So after this, we’ll be back in August with plenty more to share. Until then, around the garden we go!


024strawberries
First up, the strawberries are looking lush. though there are no strawberries anymore. It’s that time of year when they start to propagate and throw out runners, and ours are no exception!

Our huckleberry plant is just starting to produce berries. Have to wait until they turn black, though. The unripe berries are very poisonous.
Our huckleberry plant is just starting to produce berries. Have to wait until they turn black, though, as the unripe berries are very poisonous.

Things are still looking sad in the side bed, except for that one tomato plant on the right. It's trying hard to make something happen!
Things are still looking sad in the side bed, except for that one tomato plant on the right. It’s trying hard to make something happen!

In raised bed of green, only the curly endive and arugula have survived. The cabbage and kale all succumbed to the dastardly rabbits.
In raised bed of greens, only the curly endive and arugula have survived. The cabbage (left) and kale (right) seedlings all succumbed to the dastardly rabbits.

Nearly the same is true of the raised bed with lettuces. At this point, the rabbits have have it.
Nearly the same is true of the raised bed with lettuces, except for that one row of baby lettuces. At this point, the rabbits can have it.

And they ate every last pea plant as well. [SIGH] We have plans to deal with this next year...oh yes we do... (not evil plans, just plans to make the beds taller.)
And they ate every last pea plant as well. [SIGH] We have plans to deal with this next year…oh yes we do… (not evil plans, just plans to make the beds taller.)

Meanwhile, rabbits don't like cucumbers, thankfully!
Meanwhile, rabbits don’t like cucumbers, thankfully!

Destined for pickling? We shall see!
Destined for pickling? We shall see!

Meanwhile, in the beans patch, the bush beans are doing okay.
Meanwhile, in the beans patch, the bush beans are doing okay.

The rabbits didn't get them all!
The rabbits didn’t get them all!

In the center of the long bed (the beans patch), the pole beans are doing what they do best -- climbing!
In the center of the long bed (the beans patch), the pole beans are doing what they do best — climbing!

Not all the pole beans climb, some are just tall, like the fava beans. This one is just starting to flower.
Not all the pole beans are climbing varieties; some are just tall, like the fava beans. This one is just starting to flower.

The other side of the beans patch is...yes...overgrown. But! The weeds have kept away the rabbits, allowing the plants they didn't destroy to survive. (It's not really an excuse not to weed, but we'll take it if we can get some string beans!)
The other side of the beans patch is…yes…overgrown. But! The weeds have kept away the rabbits, allowing the plants they didn’t destroy to survive. (It’s not really an excuse not to weed, but we’ll take it if we can get some string beans!)

And it's working!
And it’s working!

Moving towards the back of the yard, of course we have to stop and get a picture of one of our lace-cap hydrangeas. The plant didn;t bloom last year, so we're happy to see it flowering this year.
Moving towards the back of the yard, of course we have to stop and get a picture of one of our lace-cap hydrangeas. The plant didn’t bloom last year, so we’re happy to see it flowering this year.

Steady as she goes in the back of the yard. We've got tomatoes and soybeans doing okay. And the radish plants at the front are going to seed.
Steady as she goes in the back of the yard. We’ve got tomatoes and soybeans doing okay. And the radish plants at the front right are going to seed.

A bumble bee enjoying one of the soybean flowers.
A bumble bee enjoying one of the soybean flowers.

We haven't talked much about our herb planters tyhis year, but we're certianly using them! This one contains Greek Dwarf basil -- it's small but powerful! (And delicious!)
We haven’t talked much about our herb planters this year, but we’re certainly using them! This one contains Greek Dwarf basil — it’s small but powerful! (And delicious!)

In this planter we put basil (right), along with some mixed greens and lettuces. We've harvested from this one repeatedly.
In this planter we put basil (right), along with some mixed greens and lettuces, kale, and a Brussel sprout plant! It’s a mixed bag.

And the final plant is all basil, Genovese -- it's the best on pizza!
And the final planter contains mostly basil, Genovese — it’s the best on pizza!

Belive it or not, our small hanging planter of lettuces has probably given us the most lettuces this year! Y'know why? Because the rabbits can't get at it!
Believe it or not, our small hanging planter of lettuces has probably given us the most harvests this year! Y’know why? Because the rabbits can’t get at it!

The ground cherries in our two planters have grown phenomenally, and that's despite our thinning efforts. So this year, it's almost like we have ground cherry "bushes" instead of small trees like in previous years.
The ground cherries in our two barrel planters have grown phenomenally, and that’s despite our thinning efforts. So this year, it’s almost like we have ground cherry “bushes” instead of small trees like in previous years.

This way, hopefully most of the cherries will be hidden from the squirrels -- they like them just as much as we do, unfortuanely.
This way, hopefully most of the cherries will be hidden from the squirrels — they like them just as much as we do, unfortunately.

Moving onto the stone bed, they tomatoes here are doing alright. They could be better, but we'll take what we can get.
Moving onto the stone bed, they tomatoes here are doing alright. They could be better, but we’ll take what we can get.

Not sure what variety these tomatoes are going to be. The waiting game is kind of fun!
Pretty sure this is a Rutgers tomato plant. (We had to do so much replanting of seedlings in the cold, damp spring, it’s hard to know for sure!)

In the second stone bed, one half is all squash, all the time!
In the second stone bed, the squash is doing it’s thing!

Soooooo much zucchini!
Soooooo much zucchini!

And more! This is a young golden zucchini...maybe. Or, that's what we originally planted, anyway.
And more’s on the way!

In the second half, the melons have taken over!
In the second half of the same stone bed, the melons have taken over! (Literally. They are growing all over those old carrot plants. We don’t mind them being used as scaffolding.)

Fingers crossed that we'll actually get a few melons this year.
Fingers crossed that we’ll actually get a few melons this year.

And between the two stone bed, our pepper plants in containers are doing fine.
And between the two stone bed, our pepper plants in containers are doing fine.

Soon we'll be harvesting cayennes!
Soon we’ll be harvesting cayennes!

And we don;t think we've mentioned this expereiment before, but we planted two leftover tomato seedlings in pots. They'be been sitting on our porch just growing slowly. We want to see if we can get these to grow indoor over the winter like we have with our peppers. It's a bit of a long shot, but worth trying nonetheless!
And we don’t think we’ve mentioned this experiment before, but we planted two leftover tomato seedlings in pots. They’be been sitting on our porch just growing slowly. We want to see if we can get these to grow indoor over the winter like we have with our peppers. It’s a bit of a long shot, but worth trying nonetheless!

So that’s going to do it for another update. The strange year in the garden continues — warm winter, cold spring, super hot summer. We’ll be back in two weeks to continue our adventures!

 

 

 

Advertisements

Help the discussion grow with comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s