2015’s Third Update in Pictures

Alrighty, we got a little too happy with the camera, and we have a TON of pictures to share! So, without much ado about anything, onward with the gallery!

P. S. Apologies for the several blurry photos. Getting things looking right with just the camera on the ol’ cell phone is more difficult than it should be some days.

First off, the strawberry plant. While no longer producing fruit, the thing is shooting out runners (i.e. baby strawberry plants) like mad! Plus, you'll notice a non-floweing marigold that took up residence in one of the cracks of our draiveway to the left, and some cherry tomato plants that are trying their best to the right.
First off, the strawberry plant. While no longer producing fruit, the thing is shooting out runners (i.e. baby strawberry plants) like mad! Plus, you’ll notice a non-floweing marigold that took up residence in one of the cracks of our driveway to the left, and some cherry tomato plants that are trying their best to the right.
Over by the strawberry, we have these two rather sad looking tomato plants. Turns out that the pots we bought drain too well and they have a hard time retaining water. Even with daily watering, these guys are struggling, though that have given us some tasty tomatoes.
Over by the strawberry, we have these two rather sad looking tomato plants. Turns out that the pots we bought drain too well, and they have a hard time retaining water. Even with daily watering, these guys are struggling, though that have given us some tasty tomatoes.
Moving around to the side of the house, things here are good and less good. The cabbage plant keeled over during a storm, but is somehow still flowering. Elswhere, we have tomatoes, peppers, marigolds, and tomatillos just chugging along.
Moving around to the side of the house, things here are good and less good. The cabbage plant keeled over during a storm, but is somehow still flowering (it’s the strange, yellowish mass in the center). Otherwise, we have (mostly) cherry tomatoes, peppers, marigolds, and tomatillos chugging along.
Yay, tomatillos!
Yay, tomatillos!
And the marigolds here are just so pretty.
And the marigolds here are just so pretty.
In raised bed #1 we said goodbye to the peas and soybeans. The broccoli plants look okay, but there's no broccoli. At this point, is it likely any will start? We has the same probalem with romanesco last year - nice plants but no production.
In raised bed #1 we said goodbye to the peas and soybeans. The broccoli plants in the corner look okay, but there’s no broccoli. At this point, is it likely any will start? We had the same problem with romanesco last year – nice plants but no production.
In raised bed #2, all the lettuce is going to seed, We're happy to have it re-seed the bed.
In raised bed #2, all the lettuce is going to seed, We’re happy to have it re-seed the bed.
In raised bed #3, all this blur is cucumbers, which have rightly crawled up the sides of the pvc cage. There are also a couple random cherry tomato plants doing well in here despite the climbing vines.
In raised bed #3, all this blur is cucumbers, which have rightly crawled up the sides of the PVC cage. There are also a couple random cherry tomato plants doing well in here despite the climbing vines.
And in raised bed #4, there's still plenty of kale (some of which is overdue for harvesting), several more tomato plants, and okra (big red-green leaves on the right). The particular ojkra plant in view has just developed flowers, so maybe we'll get some actual okra!
And in raised bed #4, there’s still plenty of kale (some of which is overdue for harvesting), several more tomato plants, and okra (big red-green leaves on the right). The particular okra plant in view has just developed flowers, so maybe we’ll get some actual okra! In the bare spot, we tried to replant arugula, but it didn’t take.
Moving on, here's a decent view of the first stone bed, full of tomatoes and an very, very bushy asparagus plant (We should get stalks next year.)
Moving on, here’s a decent view of the first stone bed, full of random and non-random tomatoes, and a very, very bushy asparagus plant on the end there. (We should get stalks next year. Can’t wait!)
In the second stone bed, you can see how the squash plants have spilled out over the sides. Though we planned for this, it's all rather amazing. Plus, the tomatoes plants in here have grown so large that they have started toppling over. :( Luckily, there's no problem with the fruit. This has made up rethink tomato supports -- those cheap conical cages just don't cut it when the plants get too big.
In the second stone bed, you can see how the squash plants have spilled out over the sides. Though we planned for this, it’s all rather amazing. Plus, the tomatoes plants in here have grown so large that they have started toppling over. 😦 Luckily, there’s no problem with the fruit. This has made us rethink tomato supports — those cheap conical cages just don’t cut it when the plants get too big.
So we thought we planted pumkin seeds in the section where this butternut squash is grwoing, but apparently we planted butternut squash seeds instead. No harm done -- this one will be ready to pick within the coming weeks, plus other ones have started appearing!
So we thought we planted pumpkin seeds in the section where this butternut squash is growing, but apparently we planted butternut squash seeds instead. No harm done — this one will be ready to pick within the coming weeks, plus other ones have started appearing!
Continuing the squash theme, the zucchini is still growing like mad.
Continuing the squash theme, the zucchini is still growing like mad.
And, of course, there's acorn squash. We are so looking forward to fall!
And, yes, there’s acorn squash, too. We are so looking forward to fall!
And let's not forget the tomatoes in the second stone bed. This huge Marmande was picked just after this photo was taken.
And let’s not forget the tomatoes in the second stone bed, all of which are producing like crazy. This huge Marmande was picked just after this photo was taken.
And let's not forget the ground cherries. We're getting a really great crop this year, however, we've lost many to the squirrels. They are quick to get the ones that fall on the ground.
Oh, but the ground cherries! We’re getting a really great crop this year, however, we’ve lost many to the squirrels. They are quick to get the ones that fall on the ground.
In the back, we have lots and lots and lots more. Tomatoes and peppers.
In the back, we have lots and lots and lots more. Tomatoes and peppers. Some of the plants are doing better than others.
A close-up of our most exotic tomatoes, Tlacalula Pink, a Mexican variety. These have been tough to grow, as many of the fruit rotted before ripening. Here's hoping for these two!
A close-up of our most exotic tomatoes, Tlacalula Pink, a Mexican variety. These have been tough to grow, as many of the fruit rotted before ripening. Here’s hoping for these two!
Don't ask us why we decided to grow cayenne peppers, considering neither of us really cares for hot peppers, but we did. When they are green, they're hot. When they're a pretty yellow, they are even hotter. Not sure what we'll do when they turn red. Admire them from afar, perhaps?
Don’t ask us why we decided to grow cayenne peppers, considering neither of us really cares for hot peppers, but we did. When they are green, they’re hot. When they’re a pretty yellow, they are even hotter. Not sure what we’ll do when they turn red. Admire them from afar, perhaps?
Oh, did we mentioned we created an hanging lettuce bed? Well...this is our hanging lettuce bed! There are several varieties in it, which due for some harvesting.
Did we mentioned we built a hanging lettuce bed? Well, we did. This is our hanging lettuce bed! There are several varieties in it, which due for some harvesting.
Moving over to the beans and such in the long bed, the purple bush beans are on their last kegs (just made what might be a final harvest the other day), but some of the pinto beans have started reflowering.
Moving over to the beans and such in the long bed, the purple bush beans are on their last kegs (just made what might be a final harvest the other day), but some of the pinto beans have started reflowering. (Though you’d hardly know it because of all the grass in the way. Yes, we’ve gotten a little lazy with weeding…)
On the other side of the bed, you'd hardly know there were (and still are) bush beans, as tomatoes and cucumbers have taken over!
On the other side of the long bed, you’d hardly know there were (and still are) bush beans, as random tomatoes and  random cucumbers and marigolds have taken over! Though the cucumbers on the left aren’t random — we put them there on purpose to see if they’d take, and they did!
And in the middle of the long bed, we have pole beans
And in the middle of the long bed, we have pole beans, some with actual beans! From right to left — Red Ripper cowpeas, Blue Goose cowpeas (with the long, light-colored beans visible), and Christmas Lima beans (light green plant).
The further adventures of pole beans.
The further adventures of pole beans.
And we have a fava bean. Yes, one fava bean. It's terribly exciting.
And we have a fava bean. Yes, one small fava bean – Ianto’s Fava. (Apparently they are supposed to be small.) It’s terribly exciting.
Much to our delight, we discovered that the critter didn't uproot all our sunflower seeds early on. Not sure which variety this one is, but it's not a snacking variety. It's on a very low, small plant.
Much to our delight, we discovered that the critters didn’t uproot all our sunflower seeds early on. Not sure which variety this one is, but it’s not a snacking variety. It’s on a very low, small plant.
And finally, how about a cattywampus picture of basil and stevia (long plants in front)? We still haven't figure out what to do with the stevia yet.
And finally, how about a cattywampus picture of basil and stevia (long plants in front)? We still haven’t figure out what to do with the stevia yet.

Whew — and that’s that! Hard to believe we’ve hit August already. There’s only about a month left in the traditional growing season, (though depending on the weather, stuff could continue producing well into October) which means we’re turning our sites on preservation. We managed to can some tomatoes, and cucumber pickles are next on our hit list. Though, it’s hard to argue with the great meals of late, as there’s just so much fresh produce to enjoy. It’s turning out to be a wonderful summer. 🙂

 

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4 thoughts on “2015’s Third Update in Pictures

  1. atkokosplace 08/05/2015 / 2:38 am

    You have quite a garden! How wonderful to have grown your own food! Great pictures. Thank you for sharing! Have a happy day! Koko 🙂

  2. fmajewicz 08/05/2015 / 12:16 pm

    Amazing. Sure hope I can stop by and see everything in person. I’ll take any hot peppers you don’t want! Our lettuce is about gone. I will miss be able to go out every day and pick stuff for my salad. We are going to plant more lettuce so when I get back it might be ready to eat.

    • Garden State-ments 08/06/2015 / 2:43 pm

      That would be great! But the hot peppers, like…they are really hot. Even the tiniest but sets the mouth on fire! We’re going to try to use what we can and maybe dry the rest. We’ll see.

      We’re happy that the second crop of lettuce took off, because none of those varieties survived transplanting early on. Too bad also that the second planting of arugula didn’t work. Ah, well.

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