2015’s Second Update in Pictures

Last week we made it through a couple bad storms that absolutely drenched the garden.  By the time the weekend rolled around, we barely had to water anything! Great, huh? Well…yes and no. Sure, it’s nice to be able to rely on Mother Nature for watering, but the storms did a number on some of our plants. Over the course of a couple days, in between rain storms, we had to tie up a number of tomato plants that had been blown over thanks to heavy winds.  Things are back to normal now, especially weather-wise. Looks like we’ll get a little more watering help this week, but nothing that’ll drown everything.

And just how is everything looking? We’re so glad you asked! We’ve got a huge gallery of all things in the garden below — our second update in pictures of the year. Everything is producing and flowering now, and we’ve made lots of harvests — greens, peas, beans, radishes — to keep our plates full; and there’s lots more to come. For now, we’re happy with the way most of the plants are coming along, the tomato jungle aside. (That’s getting way crazy now!) So let the scrolling begin! (And boy, there’s a lot of it…)

We have one plot of asparagus that is having the time of its life! We hope to get some seeds this year. Next year, we should be due for some actual asparagus.
We have one plot of asparagus that is having the time of its life! We hope to get some seeds this year. Next year, we should be due for some actual asparagus.
Along the back, our barrels of tomatoes and peppers are doing just fine.
Along the back, our barrels of tomatoes and peppers are doing just fine.
In the barrels, the ground cherries are starting to appear (yum!) in their little lanterns, and we've already harvested our first round of radishes and have planted more seeds.
In the barrels, the ground cherries are starting to appear in their little lanterns, and we’ve already harvested our first round of radishes and have planted more seeds.
More ground cherries and radishes.
More ground cherries and radishes.
Stevia (front) and cilantro (back). Still trying to figure out what to do with the stevia. Like, how do we process it for use?
Stevia (front) and cilantro (back). Still trying to figure out what to do with the stevia. Like, how do we process it for use?
The recently trimmed green basil will be back in no time.
The recently trimmed green basil will be back in no time.
Plenty of purple basil. We've already dried a whole lot of it!
Plenty of purple basil. We’ve already dried a whole lot of it!
Growing in the yard when we bought the house was this lacecap hydrangea. It didn't flower last year. This year it is making up for that. Soon it'll be bursting with blue!
Growing in the yard when we bought the house was this lacecap hydrangea. It didn’t flower last year. This year it is making up for that. Soon it’ll be bursting with blue!
In the first part (of three) of our long bed, we have beans, beans, and more beans!
In the first part (of three) of our long bed, we have beans, beans, and more beans!
In the center of the long bed, the pole beans (in this case Christmas Lima Beans) have stolen the show!
In the center of the long bed, the pole beans (in this case Christmas Lima Beans) have stolen the show!
Here's the last part of our long bed. The various bush bean varieties have come in very nicely, along with an extra row of cucumbers along the left edge. And yeah...tomatoes. Always tomatoes.
Here’s the last part of our long bed. The various bush bean varieties have come in very nicely, along with an extra row of cucumbers along the left edge. And yeah…tomatoes. Always tomatoes.
The marigolds (planted randomly around the yard to assist in bringing pollinators) are starting to appear slowly but surely.
The marigolds (planted randomly around the yard to assist in bringing pollinators) are starting to appear slowly but surely.
Pay no attention to the massively spindly, flowering plant there in the center (because honestly, we're still not sure what it is!). The greens around it are going strong. We'll likely make a big harvest in the next couple weeks and then plant some new seeds for a fall lettuce harvest.
Pay no attention to the massively spindly, flowering plant there in the center (because honestly, we’re still not sure what it is!). The greens around it are going strong. We’ll likely make a big harvest in the next couple weeks and then plant some new seeds for a fall lettuce harvest.
Peas, cucumbers, and surprise! More tomatoes. The cuke plants are actually doing really well -- lots of flowers area appearing now. The peas are also hanging in there. These are garden peas, and they seem to have a slightly longer growing season than the snow and snap peas we planted elsewhere.
Peas, cucumbers, and surprise! More tomatoes. The cuke plants are actually doing really well — lots of flowers area appearing now. The peas are also hanging in there. These are garden peas, and they seem to have a slightly longer growing season than the snow and snap peas we planted elsewhere.
You'd hardly believe there was anything in this raised bed besides tomatoes, but you can see the kale...barely. The okra in this bed did not do so well, probably no thanks to the tomatoes. We should have gotten rid of them early on. Live and learn.
You’d hardly believe there was anything in this raised bed besides tomatoes, but you can see the kale…barely. The okra in this bed did not do so well, probably no thanks to the tomatoes. We should have gotten rid of them early on. Live and learn.
Peas, soybeans, and broccoli, all of which are doing well to varying degrees. (We made a large harvest of peas -- those plants are dying away now.) Now, since we took this picture, something got in and ate the leaves off the soybean plants. We suspect some rabbitty foul play.
Peas, soybeans, and broccoli, all of which are doing well to varying degrees. (We made a large harvest of peas — those plants are dying away now.) Now, since we took this picture, something got in and ate the leaves off the soybean plants. We suspect some rabbitty foul play.
Got some relleno peppers that are ready to pick!
Got some relleno peppers that are ready to pick!
Things look a little straggly in the side bed. This is where we've ended up putting plants in place of those that didn't take - it's now a very random mixture of things.
Things look a little straggly in the side bed. This is where we’ve ended up putting plants in place of those that didn’t take – it’s now a very random mixture of things.
Our loner tomatoes in their own pots are doing quite well.
Our loner tomatoes in their own pots are doing quite well.
The tomato jungle in the older stone bed is still going strong. We had to move some pepper plants out of this bed because they were getting swallowed up by the sea of tomatoes. Lots of little, green tomatoes have started appearing.
The tomato jungle in the older stone bed is still going strong. We had to move some pepper plants out of this bed because they were getting swallowed up by the sea of tomatoes. Lots of little, green tomatoes have started appearing.
It's a crowd in our new stone bed! Never in a million years did we expect that the squash plants would get so big. We should have known better, but after a couple years of only getting dinky squash plants, we didn't think what would happen if they actually did well!
It’s a crowd in our new stone bed! Never in a million years did we expect that the squash plants would get so big. We should have known better, but after a couple years of only getting dinky squash plants, we didn’t think what would happen if they actually did well!
Gotta get up early in the morning to catch the squash flowers in bloom. The plants are coming along better than we could have hoped.
Gotta get up early in the morning to catch the squash flowers in bloom. The plants are coming along better than we could have hoped.
No more strawberries for awhile now, but the plant is throwing out runners, which we may replant elsewhere in the yard.
No more strawberries for awhile now, but the plant is throwing out runners, which we may replant elsewhere in the yard.

Not bad, eh? Nope, not bad at all. 🙂

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6 thoughts on “2015’s Second Update in Pictures

  1. A Really Small Farm 07/01/2015 / 6:43 pm

    I used to plant my summer squash close together, too. They’re bush varieties so how big could they get? Too big and that made it very difficult to find squash. So now they get one long row with plenty of side space. I manage to find most of the squash in time.

    I see lots of flowers in your tomato jungle. It will be interesting when they start making fruit if any are from hybrids.

    • Garden State-ments 07/02/2015 / 8:34 am

      Yeah, we’ve already got in mind that if we do squash again next year, it’ll be placed all on its own somewhere — no other plants will be near it. Then again, we’ll see if we actually get anything from these plants. We’ve got lots of flowers but not much else yet.

      Aside from the tomatoes that we started planted, we suspect that the bulk of what we get from the jungle (and elsewhere) will probably be hybrids of some kind. It’s bound to be a little wacky come harvest time!

      • A Really Small Farm 07/02/2015 / 8:47 am

        You might have some new and maybe better tomatoes.

        I’m seeing small flower buds on most of my summer and some winter squash. I’m thinking that the first blooms will be on or around July 10.

        If your squash flowers are all males so far you can cook those and eat them.

  2. fmajewicz 07/02/2015 / 9:58 am

    We have been eating a lot of greens from the lettuce, turnips, beet greens, and spinach. I’ve also been picking the young pea pods. Makes one great salad. We planted pepper plants that were suppose to be sweet peppers but the one I picked yesterday for my salad was hot. I’m happy!

    • Garden State-ments 07/06/2015 / 3:15 pm

      It all sounds very tasty! We’ve had terrible luck with root vegetables (even carrots haven’t done well enough), so we’ve steered clear of them.

      It’s funny you mention that about the peppers, because we just cooked up some of our relleno peppers, and they were much hotter than we expected. They were much milder in the past, so not sure what happened between then and now.

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