Our prolific peppers!

Anyone stumbling across this blog might think that the one and only thing growing in our garden is tomatoes, but that’s far from the case (as you already know. 🙂 ) Granted, because the tomatoes plants have been producing nonstop for the past month and a half, they’ve taken up a good bit of our time. But we’ve also had tons of success with cucumbers, basil, greens, and the subject of today’s post…peppers!

Plenty to go round!
Plenty to go round!

Waaaay back at the beginning of the year when all of our plants were just the tiniest of seedlings, the pepper plants took f-o-r-e-v-e-r to germinate.  Once they finally did, they were so small and fragile we really weren’t sure any of them would make it. Slowly but surely, however, once they were transplanted into their designated spaces, most of the plants grew up pretty happily. Almost all the plants have so far produced at least one pepper, and most of produced lots more than that! Since we didn’t have much luck with peppers last year round this time, this is quite the enjoyable boon. And what’s really wonderful is that all the pepper types that we planted have produced! So here’s what we’ve been enjoying.

First up, the banana peppers. These we planted from seeds we collected last year, and we've gotten more than we possibly know what to do with! They are wonderfully tasty and mid.
First up, the banana peppers. These we planted from seeds we collected last year, and we’ve gotten more than we possibly know what to do with! They are wonderfully tasty and mild.
Next, the red Lipstick variety. These are so delicious and quite sweet. They work wonders in stir-fry.
Next, the red Lipstick variety. These are so delicious and quite sweet. They work wonders in stir-fry.
And then, the Chocolate variety. Leave them on the plant long enough and they turn a deep, rich brown. Though they aren;t large peppers (none of ours are), they are magically delicious when stuffed! (More on that in a moment...)
And then, the Chocolate variety. Leave them on the plant long enough and they turn a deep, rich brown. Though they aren’t large peppers (none of ours are), they are magically delicious when stuffed! (More on that in a moment…)
And finally, the Relleno pepper. Not the only one, but we haven;t gotten many of these this year. The one that appear almost always end up in salsa or on tacos.
And finally, the Relleno pepper. Not the only one, but we haven’t gotten many of these this year. The ones that appear almost always end up in salsa or on tacos.

So with the Chocolate pepper we mentioned “stuffed peppers.” Many of us know that this is a classic and really tasty way to prepare peppers. Make some sort of bread or rice stuffing of your choice, hollow out a couple large bell peppers, and then cook until the peppers are soft. Voila! Instant light meal or side dish. Well, as we recently found out, you don’t necessarily have to have large bell peppers when you want to make stuffed peppers — you can use small ones too! (As long as you’re willing to accept the face that some of the stuffing might ooze out of the pepper while cooking since you can’t stand them up. Unless you cook them in some sort of deep muffin tin… Now there’s an idea!)

After going through our pantry, we came up with the following recipe:

Couscous stuffed peppers

Ingredients

1/2 cup couscous (flavored or plain)
1 large tomato, or a handful of cherry tomatoes, diced
2-3 garlic cloves, crushed
1/4 cup onion, finely diced
A couple ounces of crumbled feta cheese
6-8 small peppers — about 3-4 inches long, hollowed out and seeded P. S. We imagine you could use just about any couscous recipe, so if you have a favorite, give it a try!

Instructions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees
2. Spray a baking tray with cooking spray or cover with a sheet of parchment paper
3. Prepare couscous according to directions.
4. Once couscous has re-hydrated, add in tomatoes, garlic, onion, and feta cheese. Mix well. Season with a little salt and pepper to taste, if necessary.
5. Stuff each pepper with the couscous mixture. Enough so that it’s packed in well enough, but not to the point of breaking the pepper.
6. Lay each pepper on the baking tray. And put the lot in the oven once they are all stuffed.
7. Cook for 15-20 minutes until the peppers’ edges are browned and they appear softened.
8. Cool for 5-10 minutes before serving.

We made a great meal out of these peppers with some tabbouleh and hummus. They probably would have also been perfect with a little mint-cucumber yogurt sauce. (Maybe next time.)

Enjoy!

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Our prolific peppers!

    • Garden State-ments 10/05/2014 / 12:09 pm

      Wow, you’r recipe looks fantastic! We’ve got it bookmarked and will have to try it out soon. Thanks for the kind words — it’s been a great gardening season for so many of us!

Help the discussion grow with comments!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s