Stock check: Tomatoes

It’s really our own fault for planting so many tomatoes, y’know…cause we’re writing so much about them. Honestly though, they are probably the most interesting things in the garden right now. They are ripening in droves and it’s all we can do now to keep up with the harvesting! Just about every meal we’ve had over the past couple weeks has included tomatoes in one way or another. No worries, we’re not complaining! We’ve had some amazing meals, even when the tomatoes are just chopped up as a side and tossed with salt and pepper.

This week we’re taking a look at how the different varieties we’ve planted have fared. Of all the ones we planted, the only type that has yet to make a showing are the 2nd generation Black Krims. After we had luck with them last year, we had really hoped that at least a couple of the plants would make it, but no luck yet. It’s possible that we might still see a couple of the delicious, ruby-purple tomatoes, but we won’t be that upset if we don’t. Because here’s what we’ve seen so far.

First up, the little Super Sweet 100s are now starting to ripen. We don’t have tons now, but judging by all the green ones out there, we will soon enough! These make the perfect sweet additions to any summer salad.

Super Sweet 100s
Super Sweet 100s

Moving up in sizes we’ve been getting lots of these smaller Rutgers tomatoes. In fact, one of the plants became so large it started bowing over and we had to make supports for it! As for the tomatoes, they are also great in salads or just to snack on as they are quite sweet and slightly acidic.

Small, hybridized Rutgers
Small, hybridized Rutgers

Not to be outdone in the cherry tomato department are the Yellow Gooseberries. There’s no equal when it comes to snacking tomatoes — these yellow tomatoes are so sweet that they almost don’t taste like tomatoes! They almost have a tropical aftertaste and are really delicious.

Yellow Gooseberry tomatoes
Yellow Gooseberry tomatoes

We know that San Marzanos can be difficult to grow, and early on, we lost a bunch of these guys to blossom end rot. But the ones that have survived and ripened have been absolutely delicious. Very mild and not at all acidic. We haven’t gotten enough to make a sauce just from them, but they are great mixed in with other varieties.

San Marzanos
San Marzanos

Meanwhile, the Roma tomatoes have been doing really well, both the ones from seeds we saved last year and new seeds we got this year. All told, we prefer these roasted with a little olive oil, salt, and pepper. They are then perfect when tossed in pasta.

Various Romas
Various Romas

We’ve only gotten a couple of these very unique looking Jersey Giant tomatoes. Though they are shaped funny, they taste divine! Really great raw or cooked — they are very meaty inside with few seeds.

Jersey Giant
Jersey Giant

The regular Rutgers tomatoes have also been coming in nicely. Around here, Rutgers are the typical  “on the vine” tomatoes that can be found in the grocery stores. They are best sliced on sandwiches or burgers, but they also make great additions to sauces.

Rutgers
Rutgers

And finally, the Great Whites. Boy oh boy, these are some tomatoes! They are big, buttery, and have a really smooth taste. Very mild and sweet — almost like a melon crossed with a tomato. Though they are great sliced and simply seasoned, we’ve also roasted them with success.

Great Whites
Great Whites

So there you have it — we are swimming in tomatoes! Now we just have to figure out what to do with them all. Sure, we’re eating what we can, but we have big plans for our next adventure that we’ll cover soon.  Canning!

Altogether now!
Altogether now!
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3 thoughts on “Stock check: Tomatoes

  1. fmajewicz 08/11/2014 / 10:31 am

    Oh-canning! Have fun with that. We have given up canning in favor of freezing. One of the easiest for tomatoes is to blend them and put in freezer bags, better yet if you have a bags that can be vacuum sealed. Enjoy!

    • Garden State-ments 08/12/2014 / 2:18 pm

      If we had more freezer space, that would really be the way to go for long-term preserving. We’re looking for a good space to store jars and hope to try out canning soon!

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